Spices

Allspice

Cultural or Geographic History
Allspice comes from Jamaica, Mexico, and Honduras. Christopher Columbus discovered allspice when he was seeking pepper. Allspice was used more commonly prior to World War II. During the war, many trees producing allspice were cut, and production never fully recovered.
Flavor Profile
Pungent and fragrant, allspice reminds many people of a mixture of cloves, cinnamon, and nutmeg.
Recommendations For Use
  • Add to Jamaican jerk seasoning and Jamaican soups, stews, and curries.
  • Makes a great flavoring for ground beef in meatloaf or hamburgers.
  • Add to fruit desserts such as applesauce, fruit compotes or oatmeal cookies.
  • Use in barbeque or tomato sauces.
  • Add cracked whole allspice berries to marinades or soups.
Recommendations For Combinations
  • Can be used with cloves and cinnamon in spice cakes.
  • Add a few whole berries to your pepper grinder with a combination of peppers for a unique flavor.

Cardamom

Cultural or Geographic History
Cardamom is the ground seed of a tropical fruit in the ginger family known as Elettaria cardamomum. Cardamom comes from India, Guatemala, and Ceylon. In Sweden it has become a more popular spice than cinnamon.
Flavor Profile
Intense, pungent, sweet flavor.
Recommendations For Use
  • Use in curries and other Indian dishes.
  • Add to breads prior to baking.
  • Popular flavoring for Arabic coffee.
Recommendations For Combinations
  • Combine with curry and turmeric in Indian curries.

Cayenne Pepper

Cultural or Geographic History
Cayenne pepper comes from Central and South America and the West Indies. It is made from the dried pods of pungent chili peppers. Spanish explorers looking for black pepper misnamed the Cayenne and introduced it to the rest of the world.
Flavor Profile
Cayenne pepper has little aroma, but it is extremely hot to taste.
Recommendations For Use
  • Use to impart zesty flavor to salsa, avocado dip, taco and enchilada sauces.
  • Adds heat to barbecue or tartar sauce, vegetable dips and dressings or meat marinades.
  • Sprinkle on Tex-Mex omelets with tomatoes, onions and peppers.
Recommendations For Combinations
  • Cayenne pepper can be used in almost any spice combination where you would like a little heat added.

Chili Powder

Cultural or Geographic History
Chili powder is comprised chiefly of red, cayenne or other peppers or it may contain other spices such as cumin, oregano, garlic, cinnamon, black pepper or coriander. As a result, the spiciness of the chili powder depends on its composition. Generally, the purer it is, the spicier it will be.
Flavor Profile
Spicy and Smoky
Recommendations For Use
  • Adds heat and flavor to chilis, other bean and meat soups and stews.
  • Use as a seasoning in Mexican dishes.
Recommendations For Combinations
  • Combine with garlic and cumin for a real chili kick.

Cinnamon

Cultural or Geographic History
Cinnamon is the dried bark of various laurel trees in the cinnamomun family. The cinnamon used in North America is from the cassia tree which is grown in Vietnam, China, Indonesia and Central America.
Flavor Profile
Cinnamon has a sweet, woody fragrance.
Recommendations For Use
  • Add to cakes, cookies and desserts.
  • Delicious in savory chicken and lamb dishes from the Middle East.
  • Can be paired with apples and used in other fruit and cereal dishes.
  • For a fragrant pilaf, cook rice in cinnamon flavored broth and stir in chopped dried fruit and toasted nuts.
  • Cinnamon is the perfect partner for chocolate - use it in any chocolate dessert or drink.
Recommendations For Combinations
  • Use with allspice and cloves in spice cakes and cookies.
  • Use sticks of cinnamon with other spices to mull cider in the fall.

Cloves

Cultural or Geographic History
Cloves are the rich, brown, dried, unopened flower buds of Syzygium aromaticum, an evergreen tree in the myrtle family. Europeans did not experience cloves until about the fourth century, when the spice arrived on the continent via Arab traders as a luxury item.
Flavor Profile
Strong, pungent, and sweet.
Recommendations For Use
  • Add spicy depth to the gingerbread, cookies, applesauce, muffins, cakes, and other sweets.
  • Use as a secret ingredient in barbecue and cocktail sauces.
  • Blend ground cloves with maple syrup and drizzle over cooked sweet potatoes and winter squash.
  • Add a few whole cloves to bean and split pea soups (remove before serving).
Recommendations For Combinations
  • Use with allspice, cinnamon and nutmeg in spice cakes and cookies.

Cumin

Cultural or Geographic History
Cumin is the pale green seed of Cuminum cyminum, a small herb in the parsley family. The seed is uniformly elliptical and deeply furrowed. An ancient spice, cumin is native to the shores of the Mediterranean Sea and Egypt.
Flavor Profile
Distinctive, slightly bitter yet warm flavor.
Recommendations For Use
  • Adds a tangy flavor to lime or lemon-based marinades for chicken, turkey, lamb, or pork.
  • Add to chili, spicy meat stews, barbecue marinades, and sauces.
  • Stir toasted cumin into corn muffin batter to create an easy Tex-Mex accent.
  • Heat cumin and garlic in olive oil and drizzle over cooked vegetables or potatoes.
Recommendations For Combinations
  • Use with garlic in sautéing onions for Mexican dishes.
  • Use with turmeric, garam masala and curry powder in Indian curries.

Curry

Cultural or Geographic History
Curry powder is a blend of many spices, usually including coriander, turmeric, cumin and fenugreek and is used widely in savory dishes throughout India and Southeast Asia. Curry powder was developed by the British, during their colonial rule so they could take the taste of Indian food with them when they returned home.
Flavor Profile
Spicy, warm and pungent.
Recommendations For Use
  • Blend with sour cream or yogurt, marmalade and thyme for a quick fruit or vegetable dip.
  • Add curry powder to deviled eggs and egg salads.
  • Make an East Indian marinade for chicken or lamb with curry powder, yogurt, lime or lemon juice, and garlic.
  • Combine with chickpeas, chicken or other main ingredients for delicious Indian curries.
Recommendations For Combinations
  • Use with garlic and garam masala in Indian curries.

Garlic Powder

Cultural or Geographic History
Garlic is the dried root of Allium sativum, a member of the lily family. It grows in a bulb that consists of a number of cloves. Each clove is protected by a layer of skin, but all are held together in one larger unit by additional layers of skin. Garlic is native to central Asia, but its use spread before recorded history. Garlic came to the Western Hemisphere with some of the first European explorers, and its use spread rapidly.
Flavor Profile
Garlic has a distinctive odor and flavor.
Recommendations For Use
  • Use minced garlic or garlic chips in pasta sauces, stews, and soups.
  • Mix with oil and vinegar and Italian spices to make salad dressing.
  • Garlic powder can be used in marinades, or mixed with herbs and rubbed into poultry, pork, or beef before cooking.
Recommendations For Combinations
  • Combine garlic with cumin for Mexican dishes.
  • Use with turmeric and curry for Indian dishes.
  • Use with basil, oregano or parsley for Italian dishes.

Ginger Powder

Cultural or Geographic History
Ginger is a tuberous root from the plant Zingiber officinale. The root is often dried and ground or "crystallized" with sugar. Ginger is believed to have been cultivated by the Chinese and Indiana. It was one of the important spices that led to the opening of the spice trade routes. In the 19th century it was popular to keep a shaker of ginger on the counter in English pubs so the patrons could shake some into their drinks. This practice was the origin of ginger ale.
Flavor Profile
Slightly biting and hot note with a rich, sweet, warm, woody aroma.
Recommendations For Use
  • Use in pumpkin pies, gingerbread or gingersnaps.
  • Add fresh sliced or minced ginger to stir fries.
  • Complements many Asian dishes.
  • Serve with lemon and hot water for a cleansing hot drink.
Recommendations For Combinations
  • Combines well with garlic.

Mustard Seed

Cultural or Geographic History
Mustard seed comes from two large shrubs, Brassica juncea (brown mustard) and Brassica hirta (white mustard), native to Asia. Mustard was used in ancient Greece and Rome as a medicine and a flavoring. Mustard was taken on Spanish explorations during the 1400s.
Flavor Profile
Powdered mustard has no aroma when dry, but a hot flavor when mixed with water.
Recommendations For Use
  • Enhances meats, fish, fowl, sauces, and salad dressings.
  • Mustard seed can be used in pickling or in boiling vegetables such as cabbage or sauerkraut.
  • Brown mustard seeds are an important flavoring in Indian dishes.
  • Mustard helps emulsify liquids used in salad dressing recipes to help blend oil and vinegar.
Recommendations For Combinations
  • Combine with curry powder, turmeric, cumin or garam masala to flavor Indian curries.
  • Use with garlic cracked pepper to create a rub for steaks.

Nutmeg

Cultural or Geographic History
Nutmeg is the seed of Myristica fragrans. Interestingly, the tree produces both nutmeg and mace, and grows up to 60 feet tall. Both spices come from the tree's fruit, which splits into a scarlet outer membrane, mace, and an inner brown seed, nutmeg.
Flavor Profile
Nutmeg is more pungent and sweeter than mace.
Recommendations For Use
  • Adds flavor to sausages, meats, soups, and preserves.
  • Commonly added to eggnog, puddings, and fruit pies.
  • Can be used in puddings, stews and vegetable dishes.
  • Complements a variety of baked goods, including sweet breads, cakes, muffins, cookies, and fruit pies.
Recommendations For Combinations
  • Use with allspice, cinnamon and cloves for spice cakes and cookies.
  • Use with white pepper and allspice for spinach lasagna.

Paprika

Cultural or Geographic History
Paprika comes from a mild pepper in the family Capsicum annum. It is a brilliant red powder and often as a garnish. The peppers used in Paprika are grown in Hungary, Spain, South America, and California. Paprika, as a member of the capsicum family, is indigenous to the Western Hemisphere. The pepper is grown widely and takes on a slightly different flavor depending on the local soil and climatic conditions.
Flavor Profile
Ranges from sweet and mild to hot. American paprika is the blandest, while Hungarian paprika has the greatest range of flavor.
Recommendations For Use
  • Combine with butter, margarine, or oil for a quick baste for fish or poultry.
  • Mix with bread crumbs before sprinkling them over casseroles or vegetables.
  • Use to flavor Hungarian dishes such as goulash.
  • Use as a garnish on stuffed eggs, fish, and cheese and vegetable casseroles.
  • Spanish paprika can be used to season shellfish, rice, and sausage dishes.
Recommendations For Combinations
  • Use a small amount of strong Hungarian paprika with garlic and other spices to add spice and flavor to hearty soups like Minestrone or thick tomato sauces for pasta.

Peppers

Cultural or Geographic History
Black pepper comes from berries that are picked unripe. The berries used for white pepper are ripened on the vine and soaked so that their outer hulls are easily removed. Green peppercorns are immature berries which are freeze dried or packed in brine for preservation.
Flavor Profile
Black pepper has a sharp, pungent aroma and flavor. White pepper is hotter, less subtle and mildly fermented. Green peppercorn is milder in flavor and has a fresh taste.
Recommendations For Use
  • Use in soups, stews, chowders and cream sauces
  • Rub coarsely cracked peppercorns on steaks and chops.
  • Use to add heat to barbecue sauces, meat marinades, and vegetable stir fries
  • Add whole black peppercorns to soups and stews.
  • Simmer whole black peppercorns in fresh fruit compotes for a delicate, warm spiciness.
Recommendations For Combinations
  • Pepper is well-combined with nearly every spice. It adds depth of flavor and aroma.

Saffron

Cultural or Geographic History
Saffron is the stigma of Crocus sativus, a flowering plant in the crocus family. The world's most expensive spice, saffron is costly because more than 225,000 stigmas must be hand-picked to produce one pound. The 13th century Crusaders brought saffron from Asia to Europe, where it was used as a dye and condiment.
Flavor Profile
Spicy, pungent and bitter flavor with a sharp and penetrating odor.
Recommendations For Use
  • Use in Italian risottos.
  • Imparts color and flavor to Spanish chicken, rice and paella dishes.
  • Add to French seafood stews and bouillabaisse.
  • Use in Indian rice dishes.
Recommendations For Combinations
  • Works well with coriander and cumin in Middle Eastern rice dishes.

Sea Salt

Cultural or Geographic History
The history of salt is long and colorful and salt has played an important role throughout the ages. For example, it has been used as a form of international currency and trading commodity by explorers.
Flavor Profile
Savory.
Recommendations For Use
  • Salt can be an excellent flavor enhancer in both savory and sweet dishes when used sparingly.
Recommendations For Combinations
  • Salt complements virtually any herb or spice.

Sesame Seed

Cultural or Geographic History
Sesame seed is the seed of an annual herb, Sesamum indicum, which grows well in hot climates. Sesame seed is probably the oldest crop grown for its taste, dating back 2000 years to China.. Sesame was imported from India to Europe during the first century. Persians used sesame oil as a substitute for olive oil.
Flavor Profile
Sesame Seeds have a nut-like, mild flavor.
Recommendations For Use
  • Can be used in breads.
  • Use as a garnish on pastas or in vegetable dishes.
  • Sprinkle over salads to add texture.
  • Blend with butter or mayonnaise to make a nutty spread for chicken, turkey or tuna sandwiches.
  • Use when making Middle Eastern confections.
Recommendations For Combinations
  • Gives a nutty flavor to Chinese and Asian dishes.

Turmeric

Cultural or Geographic History
Turmeric comes from the root of Curcuma longa, a leafy plant in the ginger family and with its brilliant yellow color, has been used as a dye, medicine, and flavoring since 600 BC. In 1280, Marco Polo described turmeric as "a vegetable with the properties of saffron yet it is not really saffron." The turmeric root has a tough brown skin and bright orange flesh.
Flavor Profile
Pungent, bitter and mildly aromatic with tones of orange or ginger.
Recommendations For Use
  • Use in traditional curries, rice and chicken dishes and condiments.
  • Adds classic flavor to chutneys, pickles, and relishes.
  • Blend with melted butter and drizzle over cooked vegetables, pasta, or potatoes.
  • Use in Indian dishes, including lentil and meat dishes, and in Southeast Asian cooking.
  • Add a pinch of turmeric to fish soups.
Recommendations For Combinations
  • Can be used with curry and cardamom in Indian dishes.

Fresh and Dried Herbs

Basil

Cultural or Geographic History
Basil has been cultivated for many years. It is believed to have originated in Asia and Africa and may have been brought to ancient Greece by Alexander the Great. It is also prominently used in Thai and Vietnamese cooking.
Flavor Profile
Sweet basil is a spicy, sweet, anise (licorice) and clove-like. Other varieties include cinnamon basil, lemon basil and Thai basil. Some, like Thai basil, are bolder and spicier, while cinnamon basil combines classic basil flavor with the sweetness and warmth of cinnamon.
Recommendations For Use
  • Add to salads, soups, dips, stews, rice dishes and omelets.
  • Use as the main ingredient of pesto.
  • Makes a splash when added to Italian tomato dishes.
  • Complements eggplant and zucchini dishes.

Note: Fresh basil leaves are delicate; handle gently; wash and chop just before using.

Recommendations For Combinations
  • Can be used in combination with garlic and oregano in Italian dishes.

Bay Leaves

Cultural or Geographic History
The sweet bay or bay laurel tree is native to the Mediterranean region. It produces leathery leaves which release their aroma when rubbed. In classical times, bay laurel leaves were woven into wreaths to crown poets, scholars and athletes.
Flavor Profile
  • Place in soups or stews to impart a deep, rich flavor.
Recommendations For Use
  • Place in soups or stews to impart a deep, rich flavor.
Recommendations For Combinations
  • Bay leaves are an herb used in Herbes de Provence, a classic combination of thyme, chervil, rosemary, summer savory, lavender, tarragon, marjoram, oregano, mint and bay leaves often used for seasoning meat.
  • Bay leaves are often used in bouquet garni, a bouquet of tied herbs used to impart flavor in soups and stews.

Chives

Cultural or Geographic History
Chives belong to the same family as onions, leeks, and garlic. The Latin name of this species means 'Rush-Leek.' Although they are native to Asia and Eastern Europe, by the sixteenth century chives were common plants in herb gardens throughout Europe.
Flavor Profile
There are two main varieties of chives, onion and garlic. Onion chives have thin, hollow leaves and impart a delicate onion flavor. Garlic chives have fat leaves like blades of grass and their flavor is that of mild onion and garlic.
Recommendations For Use
  • Use in omelets, quiche, cheese spreads and dips.
  • Add to tuna or green salad; sprinkle over broiled tomatoes and other vegetables.
  • Use as a garnish potato dishes like potato salad, potato soup or baked potatoes.
Recommendations For Combinations
  • Used in fines herbes, a classic herb mixture that includes: chopped parsley, tarragon, chives, chervil and marjoram.

Cilantro

Cultural or Geographic History
Cilantro, also known as coriander, is probably one of the first spices used by mankind. The Romans spread the plant throughout Europe and it was one of the first spices to arrive in America. Coriander generally refers to the seeds of the plant, which are a spice commonly used in Asian cuisine. Cilantro refers to the leaves of the plant, which are used widely in Latin American cuisines, but also make an appearance in Chinese soups and Thai curries.
Flavor Profile
Cilantro has bold tones of citrus and sage.
Recommendations For Use
  • Use with chicken, fish, lamb, rice, pasta or vegetable dishes.
  • Makes a great addition to salsa, taco fillings, Mexican salads and lentil or black bean soups.
  • Coriander seeds can be added to Indian and Thai curries as well as other meat and vegetable dishes.
Recommendations For Combinations
  • Combine with lime juice for Latin American dishes.
  • Combine coriander with turmeric, garam masala or curry for Indian and Thai dishes.

Dill

Cultural or Geographic History
Dill is an annual of the parsley family and is related to anise, caraway, coriander, cumin, and fennel. Dill weed is the dried leaves of the herb Anethum graveolens, the same plant from which dill seed is derived.
Flavor Profile
Dill has overtones of parsley, anise and celery with a subtle lemon cast.
Recommendations For Use
  • Both the leaves and seeds of dill are popular for flavoring pickles, breads, sauerkraut, and beet dishes.
  • Dill leaves can also be used in soups and go well in egg dishes or with cheese.
  • Use as a rub for meats and fish.
  • Makes a flavorful addition to butter or as a part of a marinade
  • Add dill to dressings and dips and salads like potato, tuna, egg or pasta.
Recommendations For Combinations
  • Combine with garlic and pepper to produce a highly flavored Mediterranean or East European pork roast (often cooked over a spit outdoors).

Marjoram

Cultural or Geographic History
Sweet marjoram, usually grown as an annual, is one of the most fragrant and popular of all herbs. It has small, oval, gray-green leaves that are velvety to the touch.
Flavor Profile
Marjoram has a subtle lemon flavor with hint of balsalm and is more delicate than oregano.
Recommendations For Use
  • Add to pasta sauces or with Italian type dishes
  • Use to season veal, pork roasts, ground beef dishes and grilling or baking fish.
  • Can be used in egg dishes and omelets.
  • An essential ingredient for poultry stuffing.
  • Season vegetable dishes and soups.
  • Great accompaniment for lamb stew, marinade or herb butter.
Recommendations For Combinations
  • Used in Herbes de Provence, a classic combination of thyme, chervil, rosemary, summer savory, lavender, tarragon, marjoram, oregano, mint and bay leaves often used for seasoning meat.

Mint

Cultural or Geographic History
Mint is native to the Mediterranean and Western Asia. The Romans are thought to be responsible for carrying the herb throughout Europe.
Flavor Profile
Mint is sweet-flavored, cool and refreshing to the palate. Peppermint is more intense, while spearmint is cool. Also try pineapple or chocolate mint for something a little different.
Recommendations For Use
  • Put a sprig in the cooking water for potatoes and peas.
  • Sprinkle on soups or salads.
  • Make fresh mint sauce or jelly for lamb.
  • Adds zest to fruit salads, iced tea and lemonade.
  • Use when dressing leg of lamb.
Recommendations For Combinations
  • Used in Herbes de Provence, a classic combination of thyme, chervil, rosemary, summer savory, lavender, tarragon, marjoram, oregano, mint and bay leaves often used for seasoning meat.

Oregano

Cultural or Geographic History
Oregano, also called "wild marjoram," is a hardy perennial. Oregano is much coarser than sweet marjoram and smells more like thyme. It has small pink or white flowers. The word "Oregano" is Greek, derived and translated means "Joy of the Mountain".
Flavor Profile
Oregano is earthy and intense with hints of clove and balsalm.
Recommendations For Use
  • Can be added to almost any tomato dish.
  • Great addition to pasta sauces, pizza, chili con carne and barbecue sauce.
  • Complements egg and cheese dishes.
  • Use in meat or poultry stuffing or on pork, lamb, chicken and fish.

Note: The herb is best used dried.

Recommendations For Combinations
  • Used in Herbes de Provence, a classic combination of thyme, chervil, rosemary, summer savory, lavender, tarragon, marjoram, oregano, mint and bay leaves often used for seasoning meat
  • An essential ingredient of chili powder.

Parsley

Cultural or Geographic History
Parsley is popular because of its much-divided, sometimes curly leaves which have a characteristic flavor and smell. It can be used for both garnishing and flavoring.
Flavor Profile
Mild, savory flavor, slightly peppery; curly or Italian (flat leaf) parsley are the most common types.
Recommendations For Use
  • Use in pasta dishes, sauces, scrambled eggs, soups, mashed potatoes, vegetable dishes (carrots, cabbage, tomatoes, turnip, beets) or with poultry or fish.
  • Great deep-fried or in a tempura batter.
  • Sprinkle chopped parsley over stews, pasta dishes and casseroles.
Recommendations For Combinations
  • Parsley is often used in bouquet garni, a bouquet of tied herbs used to impart flavor in soups and stews.
  • Used in Herbes de Provence, a combination of thyme, chervil, rosemary, summer savory, lavender, tarragon, marjoram, oregano, mint and bay leaves often used for seasoning meat

Rosemary

Cultural or Geographic History
Rosemary is a hardy evergreen shrub. In ancient Greece, rosemary was believed to strengthen the brain and memory.
Flavor Profile
Piney, resinous with a hint of lemon.
Recommendations For Use
  • Use with almost any meat dish.
  • Place under the skin of roasts with garlic, especially lamb.
  • Use in a variety of marinades.
  • Makes a unique statement in savory cookies, breads and biscuits.

Note: When using individual fresh leaves (vs. sprigs), always chop finely, as leaves are tough.

Recommendations For Combinations
  • Used in Herbes de Provence, a classic combination of thyme, chervil, rosemary, summer savory, lavender, tarragon, marjoram, oregano, mint and bay leaves often used for seasoning meat.
  • Rosemary works well with basil or thyme.

Sage

Cultural or Geographic History
The use of sage goes back to the ancient Greeks and Romans who also believed that it imparted wisdom and mental acuity. Dalmatian sage, the name for the sage produced in Southeastern Europe, has been recognized as having superior aromatic properties and is noted for its mellowness.
Flavor Profile
Earthy, musty mint, camphor-like with a hint of lemon.
Recommendations For Use
  • Use in stuffing for poultry, fish, game and other meats.
  • Can be used in sauces, soups, chowders, meat pies, marinades.
  • Place under the skin of roasts and brush with olive oil.
  • Complements onions, cabbage, carrots, corn, eggplant, squash, tomatoes and other vegetables.
Recommendations For Combinations
  • Combines well with rosemary, thyme or marjoram.

Tarragon

Cultural or Geographic History
Tarragon is a small, shrubby herb in the sunflower family that is native to southern Russia and western Asia. Tarragon, unlike many other herbs, was not used by ancient peoples. It did not come into common use until the 16th century in England.
Flavor Profile
Slightly bittersweet flavor and an aroma similar to anise.
Recommendations For Use
  • Adds flavor to egg and cheese dishes, light soups and fresh fruits.
  • Use as a flavoring for vinegar or in pickles, relishes, prepared mustards, and sauces.
  • Tarragon goes well with fish, meat, soups, stews, and tomato dishes.
  • Complements green beans, asparagus, peas or carrots.

Note: Flavor is lost when tarragon is dried.

Recommendations For Combinations
  • Used in Herbes de Provence, a combination of thyme, chervil, rosemary, summer savory, lavender, tarragon, marjoram, oregano, mint and bay leaves often used for seasoning meat.
  • Baste chicken, fish or seafood with combination of tarragon, chives and lemon.

Thyme

Cultural or Geographic History
Thyme is the leaf of a shrub in the mint family called Thymus vulgaris.. Thyme is grown in southern Europe, including France, Spain and Portugal. It is also indigenous to the Mediterranean.
Flavor Profile
Subtle, dry aroma and a slightly minty flavor.
Recommendations For Use
  • Rub minced garlic and thyme over lamb, pork, or beef roasts.
  • Season cheese, tomato, and egg dishes.
  • Excellent for herb bread and flavored butters.
  • Complements mushrooms, fried potatoes, carrots and other vegetables.
  • Use in clam chowder and gumbo and French, Creole and Cajun dishes.
  • Lemon thyme is excellent with fish and chicken.
Recommendations For Combinations
  • Used in Herbes de Provence, a classic combination of thyme, chervil, rosemary, summer savory, lavender, tarragon, marjoram, oregano, mint and bay leaves often used for seasoning meat.